18 Comments

  1. fredrica parlett

    I like the distinction between a protagonist’s goal and his/her need. Sometimes my characters start revealing their real needs, thereby confounding my plans for them, because needs seem stronger than external goals.

  2. Thanks Chris and Fredrica! Yeah, the need/goal pinpointing really intrigues me and makes for an interesting character/plot interweaving. I love figuring that out in a book and have found having both pinpointed makes such great character internal dilemma in my own writing.

  3. Sabila Godfrey

    It has been apleasure for me reading the TEN points of deconstructing anovel . A big THANK U.

  4. sajjad

    plz…. tell me what are possible research questions applying deconstruction theory on novel? thanks

  5. Thanks for your comments Sajjad and Christopher. This isn’t intended as an article on the literary deconstruction criticism theory, but “deconstruct” as to take apart and examine–a guide for writers of fiction to take apart a book and examine what works and what doesn’t and apply it to their own writing. If you are looking for specific information on the literary deconstruction theory, here is one article that might help: http://fudco.com/chip/deconstr.html

  6. Lucille

    I offer curriculum support to High school English teachers and am constantly in search of fresh material to inspire particularly , novice teachers in their bid to be effective teachers. I value posts like this.

  7. Hi Scotie, as mentioned before, this isn’t intended as an article on the literary deconstruction criticism theory, but “deconstruct” as to take apart and examine–a guide for writers of fiction to take apart a book and examine what works and what doesn’t and apply it to their own writing. If you are looking for specific information on the literary deconstruction theory, here is one article that might help: http://fudco.com/chip/deconstr.html

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